TAO
TAO
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formfollowsfunctionjournal:

Four tribes of Arizona Native Americans, the Navajos, Papagos, Apaches, and Hopis, through their head men at an Indian conclave have banned the use of the traditional swastika symbol from all designs in their basket weaving and blanket making as a protest against Nazi “acts of oppression.” Fred Kaboti, Hopi (left), and Miguel Flores, Apache, are about to sign a parchment document proclaiming the ban in 1940.
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formfollowsfunctionjournal:

Good luck charms
1911, 1910, 1878.
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formfollowsfunctionjournal:

1917 advertising catalog.
Swastika Jewellery
"To the wearer of swastika will come from the four winds of heaven good luck, long life and prosperity. The swastika is the oldest cross, and the oldest symbol in the world. Of unknown origin, in frequent use in the prehistoric items, it historically first appeared on coins as early as the year 315 B.C."
 
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formfollowsfunctionjournal:

In 1925 Coca Cola made a lucky watch fob in the shape of a swastika with the slogan, “Drink Coca Cola In Bottles 5¢.”. 
At that time, the Swastika was still a symbol of ‘Good Luck’ taken from the ‘Whirling Log’ used in the US by Native American Navajo, Papago, Apache, and Hopi tribes. 
(Also the symbol used throughout history by the Celts, Indians and Greeks amongst other nationalities and religions).
The word swastika came from the Sanskrit word svastika, meaning any lucky or auspicious object, and in particular a mark made on persons and things to denote auspiciousness, or any piece of luck or well-being.
It is composed of su- meaning “good, well” and asti “being”. Suasti thus means “well-being.” The suffix -ka either forms a diminutive or intensifies the verbal meaning, and suastika might thus be translated literally as “that which is associated with well-being,”.
 
 
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